C. G. Jung Institute of Colorado

The C.G. Jung Institute of Colorado is an organization that has been in existence since 1976.  We have as one of our central goals the promotion and continuation of research in the field of Analytical psychology.

 

C.G. Jung Institute of Colorado

The C.G. Jung Institute of Colorado (CGJIC) is an organization that has been in existence since 1976. We have as one of our central goals the promotion and continuation of research in the field of Analytical Psychology. Most of the faculty are writers or artists, as well as analysts, actively engaged in our own creative/psychological work and in presenting that work to the greater Jungian and psychological communities. In the seminars, we teach using our own research, the research and writing of current and historically significant Jungians, and material from related fields of depth psychology. With over twenty-five analyst members we offer a wide diversity of approaches and ideas, helping to keep Jungian Psychology growing. While staying abreast of contemporary developments in Analytical Psychology our members retain a deep commitment to Jung's original concepts and insights. Each year, we require our students to read and study a substantial amount of C.G. Jung’s original texts, as we consider his work to be the foundation of our training program. Our seminars are designed to encourage individual students to find their own way of connecting to Jungian psychology specifically, and to depth psychology in general.

Clinical Approach
 
The analytic approach of members of the CGJIC varies with the individual analyst and the individual client. It is difficult (and counterproductive) to force rigid classifications onto either analysts or analysands. Most of the analysts of the CGJIC work broadly within the classical Jungian framework. Core features of Jungian analysis (e.g. the importance of working with the archetypal level of the psyche, integration of the unconscious, the individuation process and development of an appropriate relationship with the Self) are essential components of our work. Consistent with Jung's own flexibility around clinical work and consideration of the needs of individual clients, however, other mental health and non-mental health approaches may be used to support the analytic work with individual clients. Members of the CGJIC might, for examples, directly address an analysand's maladaptive defenses, promote relaxation techniques, address transference issues and early developmental influences, support concurrent enrollment in Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) or the appropriate use of medication if needed. The important question for the analyst (and analysand) to consider is whether these ancillary efforts support the analytic process and the analysand's individuation.  The clinical approach of many analysts in the CGJIC therefore can be considered a classical one that integrates from other fields what is relevant and helpful for the analysand's individuation.